Friday, July 18, 2014

Gennaro makes Ricotta Ravioli

This looks amazing!  Fresh pasta is not hard to make but if you do not wish to make it from scratch, most of the larger grocers carry fresh made pastas that will suffice and you can make your own sauces...


Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Vegetable Stock from Culinary Fundamentals

Yield: 1 gallon

Categories: Soup

Source: Culinary Fundamentals
Copyright: Prentice Hall


Ingredients:

2 fluid ounces Vegetable oil
1 pound Onions, sliced
1 pound Leeks, chopped
8 ounces Celery, chopped
8 ounces Green Cabbage leaf, chopped
8 ounces Carrots, chopped
8 ounces Tomato, chopped
3 each Garlic cloves, crushed
5 quarts Cold water
1 each Sachet d'épices (with 1 teaspoon fennel seeds and 3 cloves)


Process:

1. Heat the oil in a large rondeau over medium high heat and add the vegetables. Cover and sweat the vegetables for 10 to 12 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are translucent.

2. Add the water and sachet; simmer for 30 to 40 minutes.

3. Strain the stock. It may be used now, or it may be cooled and stored for later use.


Fish Stock from Culinary Fundamentals

Yield: 1 gallon

Categories: Soup

Source: Culinary Fundamentals
Copyright: Prentice Hall


Ingredients:

11 pounds Fish bones
1 pound White mirepoix, thinly sliced
10 ounces Mushroom stems and pieces (optional)
4 quarts Cold water
1 quart Dry white wine
1 each Sachet d'épices
Salt (optional), as needed


Process:

1. In a large stockpot combine the bones with the cold water, white mirepoix, sachet, and salt (if using). Simmer gently for 30 to 45 minutes, skimming the surface as necessary.

2. Strain the stock. It may be used now or it may be rapidly cooled and stored for later use.


Fish Fumet from Culinary Fundamentals

Yield: 1 gallon

Notes: *Add other aromatics to the sachet, if appropriate, such as dill (seeds or fresh stems), fennel seeds, or tarragon.

Categories: Soup

Source: Culinary Fundamentals
Copyright: Prentice Hall


Ingredients:

4 fluid ounces Canola oil or clarified butter
11 pounds Fish bones
1 pound White mirepoix, thinly sliced
10 ounces Mushroom trimmings (optional)
4 quarts Cold water
1 quart Dry white wine
1 each Sachet d'épices, *see notes
Salt (optional), as needed


Process:

1. Heat the oil or butter in a large rondeau and add the bones, white mirepoix, and mushrooms (if using).

2. Cover the pot and sweat the bones and mirepoix over medium heat for 10 to 12 minutes until the mirepoix is soft and the bones are opaque.

3. Add the water, wine, sachet, and salt, (if using) and bring to simmer.

4. Simmer for 35 to 40 minutes, skimming the surface as necessary.

5. Strain the stock. It may be used now or it may be rapidly cooled and stored for later use.

Double Chicken Broth from Culinary Fundamentals

Notes: VARIATION:

Chicken Noodle Soup: Dice or shred the reserved chicken meat and add it to the broth along with 6 ounces of cooked corn (fresh or frozen), 6 ounces of cooked egg noodles, and 2 ounces of chopped parsley.

Categories: Soup

Source: Culinary Fundamentals
Copyright: Prentice Hall


Ingredients:

3 pounds Stewing hen
2 quarts Chicken Stock
2 teaspoons Salt
6 ounces Mirepoix, medium dice
4 ounces Tomato concassé
1 each Sachet d'epices
1/2 teaspoon Salt
1/4 teaspoon Black pepper, freshly ground


Process:

1. Cut the stewing hen into quarters.

2. Place the chicken in a stock pot and add the stock and salt. The stock should cover the chicken by at least 2 inches. Bring the chicken and stock to a simmer over medium heat. Reduce the heat slightly and continue to simmer, skimming the surface as necessary, for 2 hours.

3. Add the mirepoix and tomatoes and simmer for 30 minutes.

4. Add the sachet to the broth and continue to simmer until the chicken is fully cooked and tender and the broth has a rich flavor and good body, another 30 to 40 minutes.

(Note: Remove the chicken from the broth when fully cooked and tender (the breast portions may complete cooking before the thighs) and pull the meat away from the bones. Discard the bones, skin, and tendons. Reserve the meat to use as a garnish for the broth or for other applications.)

5. Taste the broth and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper. Strain the broth through a fine wire mesh sieve or cheesecloth.

6. Degrease the broth if necessary. It is ready to serve now, use as an ingredient in another dish, or it may be properly cooled and stored for a later use.


Court Bouillon from Culinary Fundimentals

Yield: 1 gallon

Categories: Soup

Source: Culinary Fundamentals
Copyright: Prentice Hall


Ingredients:

5 quarts Cold water
8 fluid ounces White wine vinegar
Salt (optional), as needed
12 ounces Carrots, sliced
1 pound Onions, sliced
1 pinch Dried thyme
3 each Bay leaves
12 each Parsley stems
1/2 teaspoon Peppercorns


Process:

1. Combine all the ingredients, except the peppercorns, in a large stockpot. Simmer for 50 minutes.

2. Add the peppercorns and simmer for 10 minutes more.

3. The court bouillon may be used now, or it may be cooled and stored for later use.

Chicken Stock from Culinary Fundamentals

Yield: 1 gallon

Notes: Replace 2 pounds of the chicken bones with turkey necks for an extra rich, gelatinous stock.

Add to the aromatic ingredients suggested here or replace them with other ingredients to achieve a particular flavor. Options for a specific flavor in the finished stock include: sliced fresh ginger, lemongrass, fresh or dried chiles, strongly flavored herbs, such as tarragon or rosemary, mushroom stems.

Using a prepared stock or rémouillage gives stocks greater body and flavor. These stocks are sometimes known as double-strength.

Categories: Soup

Source: Culinary Fundamentals
Copyright: Prentice Hall

Ingredients:

8 pounds Chicken bones, cut into 3-inch lengths.
6 quarts Cold water
1 pound Mirepoix, medium dice
1 each Sachet d'épices


Process:

1. Rinse the bones under cool running water and place in a stockpot.

2. Add cold water to cover the bones by about 2 inches. Bring the stock to a boil. Skim the surface as necessary. Reduce the heat and continue to simmer for 3 to 4 hours.

3. Add the mirepoix and sachet and continue to simmer the stock 1 or 2 more hours, skimming as necessary and tasting from time to time. Strain the stock through a sieve or a colander lined with rinsed cheesecloth. The stock may be used at this point, or it may be properly cooled, labeled, and stored.